Conference Presentation: Travel Influencers and Ethics of Authenticity

Social media personalities, bloggers, and other influencers have been questioned for their ethics because of fears associated with influencers marketing products without telling their audiences. Joe Sinkwitz has an accessible summary of the concerns around influencers’ lack of disclosure. My research group on influencers within the travel industry sought to explore how these workers understood their ethical obligations to their audiences. Our paper, titled “Ethics of Authenticity: Travel Influencers and the Production of Sponsored Content,” was recently accepted to the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication national conference. Mariah Wellman will be presenting the conference in Washington D.C. this August. Continue reading “Conference Presentation: Travel Influencers and Ethics of Authenticity”

Conference Presentation: Bridging the Gap

Brian Ekdale, Melissa Tully, Mariah Wellman, and I launched a research group during my first semester at the University of Iowa. We blended our interest in production, global media, travel, blogging, and social media to start an on-going project that explores how travel influencers and destination marketing organizations work together, which includes questions about the ethics of disclosure, the negotiation of labor and compensation practices, and much more. The first paper our research group produced, entitled “Bridging the Gap: Influencers, Destination Marketers, and Intermediaries in the Changing Travel and Tourism Media Industry,” was accepted into the 68th annual International Communication Association conference taking place in Prague, Czech Republic in May. Brian and Melissa will be presenting the paper, so the picture at the top of this post was basically meant as self-torture since I can’t attend the conference.

Here’s the abstract for the paper: Continue reading “Conference Presentation: Bridging the Gap”